Twin Tornadoes Wipe Out Nebraska Town

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Nestled close to the Elkhorn River in Nebraska, Pilger is a small town of just 350 people. Folklore stated that the little town would never see a tornado because it was so close to the river. Instead of one tornado, Pilger saw twin tornadoes on Monday, June 16. According to meteorologists, twin tornadoes are unusual and only occur every 10 to 15 years.

Meteorologist at NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma, Greg Carbin, stated that it is unclear how strong the tornadoes were, but that “the atmosphere was incredibly supportive of very strong tornadoes, and by all accounts, that was a violent tornado.” Nebraska Governor, Dave Heineman, declared a state of emergency for the area hit by the storms.

The tornadoes that ripped through Pilger destroyed the town’s business district, fire station and leveled at least 40 homes. The storm knocked out electricity, water and sewage services.

“More than half of the town is gone — absolutely gone,” Jerry Weatherholt, Stanton County Commissioner, told the Associated Press. “The co-op is gone, the grain bins are gone, and it looks like almost every house in town has some damage. It’s a complete mess.”

Two died from the storm, a 5-year-old girl and a second traffic accident death most likely weather-related. Sixteen others were critically injured. Residents of the town were allowed to return Tuesday morning after being evacuated. The map below indicates the location of Pilger, just northwest of Omaha. Nebraska map

Other Nebraska towns were affected by the storms including Madison, Mineral Point, Plateville and Verona. At least 25 homes were severely damaged in Madison and 19 in Verona. Madison Mayor, Paul Sogin, stated that 25 homes were damaged during the storm causing more than $10 million in damage. During the same night, the National Weather Service received reports of tornadoes in Iowa, North Dakota and Wisconsin. The University of Wisconsin was closed Tuesday due to loss of power.

As with any disaster, preparedness is vitally important. Ready.gov provides steps to take before, during and after a tornado to prepare yourself and business for possible destruction.

Before a Tornado

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. Make sure your employees have made the necessary precautions at home. Family always comes first.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  • Be alert to changing weather conditions. Look for approaching storms.
  • Look for the following danger signs:
    • Dark, often greenish sky
    • Large hail
    • A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
    • Loud roar, similar to a freight train.
    • If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.
    • During a Tornado
    • If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately!  Most injuries associated with high winds are from flying debris, so remember to protect your head.

During a Tornado

If you are in: 

Then: 

 A structure (e.g. residence, small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building)

  • Go to a pre-designated area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of a small interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck.

  • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.

  • Put on sturdy shoes.

  • Do not open windows.

 A manufactured home or office

 

  • Get out immediately and go to a pre-identified location such as the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes.

 The outside with no shelter 

 If you are not in a sturdy building, there is no single research-based recommendation for what last-resort action to take because many factors can affect your decision. Possible actions include:

  • Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If your vehicle is hit by flying debris while you are driving, pull over and park.

  • Take cover in a stationary vehicle. Put the seat belt on and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.

  • Lie in an area noticeably lower than the level of the roadway and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.

In all situations:

  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.

  • Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter.

  • Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

   
After a Tornado

Injury may result from the direct impact of a tornado or it may occur afterward when people walk among debris and enter damaged buildings. A study of injuries after a tornado in Marion, Illinois, showed that 50 percent of the tornado-related injuries were suffered during rescue attempts, cleanup and other post-tornado activities. Nearly a third of the injuries resulted from stepping on nails. Because tornadoes often damage power lines, gas lines or electrical systems, there is a risk of fire, electrocution or an explosion. Protecting yourself and your family requires promptly treating any injuries suffered during the storm and using extreme care to avoid further hazards.

Injuries

Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured people unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Get medical assistance immediately. If someone has stopped breathing, begin CPR if you are trained to do so. Stop a bleeding injury by applying direct pressure to the wound. Have any puncture wound evaluated by a physician. If you are trapped, try to attract attention to your location.

General Safety Precautions

Here are some safety precautions that could help you avoid injury after a tornado:

  • Continue to monitor your battery-powered radio or television for emergency information.
  • Be careful when entering any structure that has been damaged.
  • Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves and gloves when handling or walking on or near debris.
  • Be aware of hazards from exposed nails and broken glass.
  • Do not touch downed power lines or objects in contact with downed lines. Report electrical hazards to the police and the utility company.
  • Use battery-powered lanterns, if possible, rather than candles to light homes without electrical power. If you use candles, make sure they are in safe holders away from curtains, paper, wood or other flammable items. Never leave a candle burning when you are out of the room.
  • Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, garage or camper – or even outside near an open window, door or vent. Carbon monoxide (CO) – an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death if you breathe it – from these sources can build up in your home, garage or camper and poison the people and animals inside. Seek prompt medical attention if you suspect CO poisoning and are feeling dizzy, light-headed or nauseated.
  • Hang up displaced telephone receivers that may have been knocked off by the tornado, but stay off the telephone, except to report an emergency.
  • Cooperate fully with public safety officials.
  • Respond to requests for volunteer assistance by police, fire fighters, emergency management and relief organizations, but do not go into damaged areas unless assistance has been requested. Your presence could hamper relief efforts and you could endanger yourself.

Inspecting the Damage

After a tornado, be aware of possible structural, electrical or gas-leak hazards in your home. Contact your local city or county building inspectors for information on structural safety codes and standards. They may also offer suggestions on finding a qualified contractor to do work for you.

In general, if you suspect any damage to your home, shut off electrical power, natural gas and propane tanks to avoid fire, electrocution or explosions.

If it is dark when you are inspecting your home, use a flashlight rather than a candle or torch to avoid the risk of fire or explosion in a damaged home.

If you see frayed wiring or sparks, or if there is an odor of something burning, you should immediately shut off the electrical system at the main circuit breaker if you have not done so already.

If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows and leave the house immediately. Notify the gas company, the police or fire departments, or State Fire Marshal’s office and do not turn on the lights, light matches, smoke or do anything that could cause a spark. Do not return to your house until you are told it is safe to do so.

Safety During Clean Up

  • Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves and gloves.Screen shot 2014-05-29 at 3.03.46 PM

  • Learn proper safety procedures and operating instructions before operating any gas-powered or electric-powered saws or tools.

  • Clean up spilled medicines, drugs, flammable liquids and other potentially hazardous materials.

FEMA has also provided precautionary measures to prepare for a tornado.

To prepare for any and all natural disasters, make sure to download the free Disaster Ready People for a Disaster Ready America book.

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